Connecticut Cannabis Law History

Connecticut became the 17th state to recognize the medical use of cannabis when Governor Dannel Malloy signed legislation that allowed for the palliative use of cannabis and called for the establishment of state-licensed dispensaries and producers. The Department of Consumer Protection became responsible for administering Connecticut’s medical marijuana program with the enactment of Chapter 420f of the Connecticut General Statutes, “An Act Concerning The Palliative Use Of Marijuana”, on May 31, 2012.

A list of the current operating dispensaries can be found here.

Qualifying Conditions

Certified physicians may only recommend medical marijuana for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Positive Status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Damage to the Nervous Tissue of the Spinal Cord with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Epilepsy
  • Cachexia
  • Wasting Syndrome
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Post Laminectomy Syndrome with Chronic Radiculopathy
  • Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder


For Patients Under 18, Debilitating Medical Conditions Include:

  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Severe Epilepsy
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

Qualifications for a Registration Certificate

  • Qualifying patient must be a Connecticut resident.
  • Qualifying patient must be at least eighteen (18) years of age or older.
  • Qualifying patient cannot be an inmate confined in a correctional institution or facility under the supervision of the Connecticut Department of Corrections.

Key Dates

The application period for new medical dispensaries in Connecticut began on January 3, 2018 and closes on April 9, 2018.

Application Fees/Start-up Costs

  • There is a $1,000 non-refundable application fee for new dispensaries.
  • Registration fees for new dispensaries are $5,000.
  • Renewal fees for dispensaries are $5,000.

License types

The Department of Consumer Protection intends on licensing between three (3) and ten (10) new dispensaries. Holders of dispensary licenses may operate at up to five (5) locations.

 

       Photo by Flickr user versageek

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